Australian Pork 

Most Australians don’t realise there are plenty of health benefits to getting more pork on your fork. Fresh pork consumption has increased by 35% in the past decade and it’s now the nation’s second favourite protein, when looking at fresh and processed pork combined. People find pork is versatile, value-for-money and has cuts that range from the lean to the indulgent. Most, however, have little idea about the nutrients contained in Aussie pork and the health benefits it can deliver.

Australians first discovered pork’s health credentials in TV advertising seven years ago. The ad from Australian Pork focused on the humble pork fillet, which many were surprised to learn has less than half the fat of beef fillets, less fat than snapper fillets and are leaner than skinless chicken breast fillet[i] .

 Research projects conducted between 2005 and 2019 have found benefits in weight loss and diabetes management, as well as benefits to quality of life, general health and quality of sleep.[ii] Lean pork has been found to be as satiating as other meats, perhaps even more so.[iii] While the low in fat message is well-received, pork has a lot more to offer. It’s a rich source of protein, vitamins and minerals, delivering nutrients like thiamine, niacin and zinc. In fact, when comparing popular Australian cuts, it is clear just how much of a valuable source of Thiamin (B1) pork mince and leg steak can be:

 

Raw Mince – Thiamin levels, per 100g

Pork mince (untrimmed, raw)

0.72mg

Beef mince (regular fat, raw)

0.046mg

Chicken mince (raw)

0.11mg

Lamb mince (raw)

0.09mg

Source: Food Standards Australia and New Zealand 2010 NUTTAB database, based on 100g uncooked pork mince (untrimmed) vs uncooked beef mince (regular fat), uncooked chicken mince and uncooked lamb mince.

 Raw Leg Steak - Thiamin levels, per 100g

Pork leg steak, (untrimmed)

1.115mg

Beef rump steak (untrimmed)

0.025mg

Chicken thigh (lean flesh, skin & fat)

0.076mg

Lamb steak (untrimmed)

0.113mg

Source: Food Standards Australia and New Zealand 2010 NUTTAB database, based on 100g uncooked pork leg steak (untrimmed) vs uncooked beef rump steak (untrimmed), uncooked chicken thigh (lean flesh, skin & fat) and uncooked lamb steak (untrimmed).

 While our cognitive function is expected to change as we age, the B group vitamins, including thiamin, and selenium, found in fresh pork help maintain this function and prevent premature cognitive decline.

Australian pork can deliver valuable vitamins and nutrients that support growth, development and healthy ageing. On top of this, it’s incredibly versatile, great value for money and has a lower carbon footprint than other red meats. It’s no wonder Aussies are getting more pork on their forks, and now you know it’s good for you too!

To find out more about Australian Pork cuts that are suitable for hospitality in health and aged care, please contact University Meat on 0412361815 to find out more.

 


 IHHC Magazine

[i] Food Standards Australia and New Zealand 2010 NUTTAB database, based on 200g uncooked fully trimmed pork fillet, fully trimmed beef fillet steaks, snapper fillets (flesh) and lean chicken breast fillets (skin removed).

[ii] Dr Karen Murphy, Australian Pork Research Institute Limited (APRIL) project 3B-114, reviewed and collated the results of 16 health research projects undertaken for the Pork Cooperative Research Centre from 2005-2019.

[iii] “Pork, beef and chicken have similar effects on acute satiety and hormonal markers of appetite”; Karen E Charlton, Linda C Tapsell, Marikja J Batterham, Rebecca Thorne, Jane O’Shea, Qingshen Zhang, Eleanor J Beck; Appetite, Journal 56 2011, pp1-8